[TheThinkTank] Earn-a-Bike Programs (Nicole Muratore)

Jack Murphy jack at bikewalkwichita.org
Wed Jan 12 14:10:10 PST 2022


Bike Walk Wichita has been successful tracking volunteer hours and letting
people spend time like money. All used parts are priced in hours/$'s and
our system lets us know "how many hours I got?" at a glance. Voucher bikes
are ready to roll with lights lock, given to people who've received a
voucher from one of the various nonprofits we partner with. Some nonprofits
we limit to 1 voucher per quarter, others don't have a limit. This helps
nonprofits understand the value of a completed bike, and they can refer
clients who are able to put in the time to our 15 hour Build a Bike program
and do that discernment on who gets a free bike.
Jack Murphy

On Wed, Jan 12, 2022 at 3:50 PM Nicole Muratore <nicole at bikesaviours.org>
wrote:

>
> Wow! Very insightful replies so far and cause for me to pause and think
> about how our "everyone that puts something into the collective, gets
> something out of it" vibe is preventing us from helping people.  Scott,
> you're absolutely right. Third party vetting certainly takes a lot of
> skilled work off our shoulders. A hybrid of volunteering, third-party
> vetting, and even accepting community work done elsewhere will likely be
> where we land.
>
> Nicholas, I'm curious about the pay-what-you-want model and wonder how it
> would go over in our shop. We're a bike flipper's mecca and these items are
> often used as currency among our unhoused patrons - especially right now
> with COVID and folks being unhoused as a result of some major rent hikes.
> Is it abused much that you know? Are there limits to the level of
> componentry? Is it this way for bikes, too? Thanks again for the thorough
> and thoughtful response.
>
> Carlyn, do you usually have enough work trade for someone to earn a bike
> in a reasonable amount of time? Do folks come back and complete their hours
> most of the time? I love that your program has high utilization! I hope
> ours will, too.
>
> Nicole
>
>
> On Wed, Jan 12, 2022 at 2:03 PM <
> thethinktank-request at lists.bikecollectives.org> wrote:
>
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>> Today's Topics:
>>
>>    1. Earn-a-Bike Programs (Nicole Muratore)
>>    2. Re: Earn-a-Bike Programs (Scott Long)
>>    3. Re: Earn-a-Bike Programs (cyclista at inventati.org)
>>    4. Re: Earn-a-Bike Programs (Carlyn Arteaga)
>>    5. Bike!Bike! ?Dondequiera! / Everywhere! 2021 in review / en
>>       revisi?n (Angel York)
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Nicole Muratore <nicole at bikesaviours.org>
>> To: thethinktank at lists.bikecollectives.org
>> Cc:
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:54:39 -0700
>> Subject: [TheThinkTank] Earn-a-Bike Programs
>> The last iteration of ours required an individual to volunteer 12 hours
>> of time in exchange for a bike we'd teach them to fix up, a set of lights,
>> and a lock. These folks are already facing transportation issues and have
>> difficulty returning to the shop to complete the hours they started.
>>
>> Separate from earn-a-bike we offer work trade at a rate of $10/hour for
>> shop credit that can be used for stand time or regular-priced parts needed
>> to fix one's bike.
>>
>> If your shop has an earn-a-bike program or similar, how does it work? And
>> is utilization of the program high? Any input, documentation, etc. is
>> appreciated!
>>
>> Cheers,
>> *Nicole Muratore, Shop Manager* (she/her)
>> Bike Saviours Bicycle Collective
>> (602) 429-9369 | bikesaviours.org | @bikesaviours
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Scott Long <scott.m.long at gmail.com>
>> To: The Think Tank <thethinktank at lists.bikecollectives.org>
>> Cc:
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:34:33 -0500
>> Subject: Re: [TheThinkTank] Earn-a-Bike Programs
>> Hi Nicole,
>>
>> I'm the Executive Director of BikeAthens here in Athens GA. I've been the
>> administrator for our Earn A Bike Program for over five years. We use
>> social service partners in our area to refer clients to us that need
>> transportation.
>>
>> How do you avoid means testing? You do that by letting it be someone
>> else's job. In theory, you and the other collective members are a) excited
>> about bikes and b) have other jobs and responsibilities that don't revolve
>> around being full-time social workers. I don't decide who gets a bike. I
>> just decide which one they get. The referring organization does the heavy
>> lifting by having interviewed and worked with the potential client. Often
>> they are licensed social workers to some extent or another. They are in a
>> much better position to make that judgment call. It also gives me an easy
>> way out of the conversation when a random person shows up telling me that
>> they heard if they come down here they can get a free bike. I even have a
>> pamphlet I give them that explains our referral process.
>>
>> We have a very low threshold for what types of organizations we partner
>> with. Any reasonably legit third party that is willing to email or call on
>> behalf of someone they know that needs a bike is in. That is to say, pretty
>> much any 501c3 non-profit, school or church organization can send a request
>> on behalf of a client. Our expectations are just that they believe that
>> having a bike would help their client better find a job, get to school, and
>> access social services or healthcare. We don't require an MOU unless they
>> want one. Some partner organizations have their own criteria for whether or
>> not they will send us a request. For example, the Salvation Army in Athens
>> will only send a referral if the client already has a job. A local
>> addiction recovery organization requires the client to sign a contract that
>> they will take care of the bike, keep it locked, and return it if they are
>> no longer using it. If the partner organization would like to protect a
>> client's identity, that's fine. They can make up a client number or send me
>> initials. As long as they tell me how tall they are, we're good.
>>
>> You may not have the same community partners over time, there is decent
>> turnover in a lot of other social service organizations and sometimes new
>> people aren't aware they can even help their clients find help with bikes.
>>
>> Let me know if that is helpful or if you have any other questions.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Scott
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 11, 2022 at 4:54 PM Nicole Muratore <nicole at bikesaviours.org>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The last iteration of ours required an individual to volunteer 12 hours
>>> of time in exchange for a bike we'd teach them to fix up, a set of lights,
>>> and a lock. These folks are already facing transportation issues and have
>>> difficulty returning to the shop to complete the hours they started.
>>>
>>> Separate from earn-a-bike we offer work trade at a rate of $10/hour for
>>> shop credit that can be used for stand time or regular-priced parts needed
>>> to fix one's bike.
>>>
>>> If your shop has an earn-a-bike program or similar, how does it work?
>>> And is utilization of the program high? Any input, documentation, etc. is
>>> appreciated!
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> *Nicole Muratore, Shop Manager* (she/her)
>>> Bike Saviours Bicycle Collective
>>> (602) 429-9369 | bikesaviours.org | @bikesaviours
>>> ____________________________________
>>>
>>> The ThinkTank mailing List
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe from this list here:
>>> http://lists.bikecollectives.org/options.cgi/thethinktank-bikecollectives.org
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: cyclista at inventati.org
>> To: thethinktank at lists.bikecollectives.org
>> Cc:
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:22:48 +0000
>> Subject: Re: [TheThinkTank] Earn-a-Bike Programs
>> Hi Nicole,
>>
>> At RIBs, for many years, we had similar requirements to those you
>> describe for your shop. At one point we also had a different, simpler
>> system, wherein the applicant was required to fix up one bike for
>> someone else in order to be allowed to fix up one bike for themselves.
>>
>> What we found  was exactly what you have found, which was that the
>> highest need groups found both of these bars too high to reach. In many
>> cases, the policy was also seen as unfriendly: some people needing the
>> resource were in an especially high state of life stress, as well as
>> being subject to social ostracism generally, and being told they must
>> not only navigate this difficult learning curve, but do work that didn't
>> further their own immediate (read: urgent) needs was, frankly,
>> inconsiderate. Even though we at the shop were good people only trying
>> to help, we just didn't understand.
>>
>> So the lesson was that higher order concepts like community development
>> and mutual aid aren't really great to evangelize to people undergoing
>> crisis. In kind, that we in the shop had bad calibration wrt what
>> represented crisis. We might have thought of it as extreme things such
>> as "are you being evicted" or "have you lost housing because your
>> partner threatened your life and your only other housing options are
>> with substance abusing people you had been trying to separate yourself
>> from because you are trying to stay clean to regain legal custody of
>> your children", but in reality significant states of crisis can be much
>> more insidious and mundane. Someone can be in a state of significant,
>> ongoing crisis simply because they are disrespected at their job and
>> their childcare involves significant emotional burden, and they feel
>> unloved in their partner relationship. Crisis can be difficult to
>> recognize for someone not familiar with it, especially where it stems
>> from conditions such as generational poverty and trauma. And crisis
>> isn't necessarily a transitory state. It can last for most or all of a
>> person's life, especiallly where generational effects are involved.
>>
>> So what we did was entirely remove our requirements for volunteering in
>> return for use of the space, and replaced them with only a
>> pay-what-you-want requirement for parts and a polite reminder that we
>> accept donations.
>>
>> What we saw was a dramatic reduction in ghosting. Nearly all
>> participants of every demographic returned to complete their projects. A
>> rough guess would be that around 2% abandoned projects they started,
>> most of those being students with busy academic/social schedules or
>> hobbyists who lost interest in a frivolous idea. Over the four years we
>> had these relaxed policies, nearly all in-need participants completed
>> their bikes (or repairs) and left with safe and satisfying wheels under
>> them.
>>
>> This higher rate of effectiveness did come at a cost, however. When we
>> had volunteer requirements, it did force a lot more people to stay and
>> be part of the environment for longer periods of time, contributing to
>> shop culture and character. Requirements also forced kids to learn: most
>> of the street-level kids in our community don't stay and learn unless
>> they are made to. In these cases the reward-incentive-for-work concept
>> seems to be something that must be imposed, rather than guided or
>> facilitated, in order to take root. So though we retained significant
>> child attendance in the case of those visiting with various guardians,
>> we also lost a lot (actually most) of our solo child participation by
>> removing requirements.
>>
>> In general, I'd say our volunteer community was reduced by about half by
>> these measures, with only people who volunteered out of passion and joy
>> remaining. Our shop was small and had never really run on exclusively
>> volunteer labor except at the beginning (thirty years ago) when it was
>> even smaller and being run out of random garages, so this wasn't a
>> lethal change for us. It did create much greater demands/stress on paid
>> staff and primary volunteers.
>>
>> I think it's possible to not go entirely one way or another, for
>> instance to have volunteer requirements for children but not adults
>> (though it might be painful to justify to kids who noticed the
>> disparity), or create tiers of service/use some of which would required
>> volunteering. We just basically treated the shop as a library and the
>> staff and primary volunteers as librarians, and let the community use
>> the space so long as they did so without harming it.
>>
>> An idea for a tier of access that could require volunteer hours might be
>> keyed off-hours access. This is really only sustainable now with the
>> advent of [more] affordable electronic locks - in the past people with
>> keys made copies, kept them essentially forever, and any abuse would
>> require changing the locks. I'd encourage shop budget to be spent on
>> this kind of lock, or even the more expensive mechanical versions, even
>> though it involves significant expense. In retrospect, it was the lack
>> of this investment that prevented us from exploring options such as the
>> one suggested above, and eventually we were making enough money that we
>> could have afforded it. It's so difficult to see every option in every
>> moment when you're busy af with so many things.
>>
>> ~cyclista Nicholas
>>
>>
>>
>> On 2022-01-11 21:54, Nicole Muratore wrote:
>> > The last iteration of ours required an individual to volunteer 12 hours
>> > of
>> > time in exchange for a bike we'd teach them to fix up, a set of lights,
>> > and
>> > a lock. These folks are already facing transportation issues and have
>> > difficulty returning to the shop to complete the hours they started.
>> >
>> > Separate from earn-a-bike we offer work trade at a rate of $10/hour for
>> > shop credit that can be used for stand time or regular-priced parts
>> > needed
>> > to fix one's bike.
>> >
>> > If your shop has an earn-a-bike program or similar, how does it work?
>> > And
>> > is utilization of the program high? Any input, documentation, etc. is
>> > appreciated!
>> >
>> > Cheers,
>> > *Nicole Muratore, Shop Manager* (she/her)
>> > Bike Saviours Bicycle Collective
>> > (602) 429-9369 | bikesaviours.org | @bikesaviours
>> >
>> > ____________________________________
>> >
>> > The ThinkTank mailing List
>> >
>> > Unsubscribe from this list here:
>> >
>> http://lists.bikecollectives.org/options.cgi/thethinktank-bikecollectives.org
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Carlyn Arteaga <carlyn.arteaga at bicas.org>
>> To: The Think Tank <thethinktank at lists.bikecollectives.org>
>> Cc:
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 16:49:11 -0700
>> Subject: Re: [TheThinkTank] Earn-a-Bike Programs
>> Hi Nicole,
>> Carlyn from BICAS in Tucson, AZ here. Our Earn-a-Bike program is
>> encapsulated into our Work Trade Program -- Folks earn $12/hr to help us
>> out around the shop and they can use that credit towards 1 bike per year,
>> used parts, and Community Tools (stand time) to fix it up. All the bikes in
>> our shop are priced, so folks just calculate how much work they need to do
>> to earn whichever bike they like. It is a very heavily-used program and we
>> get referrals from social services orgs all over the county. We currently
>> have a cap of $200 per person per year, although we are currently
>> evaluating that cap as well as the Work Trade rate. Feel free to reach out
>> if you have any other questions.
>> Sincerely,
>> ~Carlyn
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 11, 2022 at 3:34 PM Scott Long <scott.m.long at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Nicole,
>>>
>>> I'm the Executive Director of BikeAthens here in Athens GA. I've been
>>> the administrator for our Earn A Bike Program for over five years. We use
>>> social service partners in our area to refer clients to us that need
>>> transportation.
>>>
>>> How do you avoid means testing? You do that by letting it be someone
>>> else's job. In theory, you and the other collective members are a) excited
>>> about bikes and b) have other jobs and responsibilities that don't revolve
>>> around being full-time social workers. I don't decide who gets a bike. I
>>> just decide which one they get. The referring organization does the heavy
>>> lifting by having interviewed and worked with the potential client. Often
>>> they are licensed social workers to some extent or another. They are in a
>>> much better position to make that judgment call. It also gives me an easy
>>> way out of the conversation when a random person shows up telling me that
>>> they heard if they come down here they can get a free bike. I even have a
>>> pamphlet I give them that explains our referral process.
>>>
>>> We have a very low threshold for what types of organizations we partner
>>> with. Any reasonably legit third party that is willing to email or call on
>>> behalf of someone they know that needs a bike is in. That is to say, pretty
>>> much any 501c3 non-profit, school or church organization can send a request
>>> on behalf of a client. Our expectations are just that they believe that
>>> having a bike would help their client better find a job, get to school, and
>>> access social services or healthcare. We don't require an MOU unless they
>>> want one. Some partner organizations have their own criteria for whether or
>>> not they will send us a request. For example, the Salvation Army in Athens
>>> will only send a referral if the client already has a job. A local
>>> addiction recovery organization requires the client to sign a contract that
>>> they will take care of the bike, keep it locked, and return it if they are
>>> no longer using it. If the partner organization would like to protect a
>>> client's identity, that's fine. They can make up a client number or send me
>>> initials. As long as they tell me how tall they are, we're good.
>>>
>>> You may not have the same community partners over time, there is decent
>>> turnover in a lot of other social service organizations and sometimes new
>>> people aren't aware they can even help their clients find help with bikes.
>>>
>>> Let me know if that is helpful or if you have any other questions.
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>>
>>> Scott
>>>
>>> On Tue, Jan 11, 2022 at 4:54 PM Nicole Muratore <nicole at bikesaviours.org>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> The last iteration of ours required an individual to volunteer 12 hours
>>>> of time in exchange for a bike we'd teach them to fix up, a set of lights,
>>>> and a lock. These folks are already facing transportation issues and have
>>>> difficulty returning to the shop to complete the hours they started.
>>>>
>>>> Separate from earn-a-bike we offer work trade at a rate of $10/hour for
>>>> shop credit that can be used for stand time or regular-priced parts needed
>>>> to fix one's bike.
>>>>
>>>> If your shop has an earn-a-bike program or similar, how does it work?
>>>> And is utilization of the program high? Any input, documentation, etc. is
>>>> appreciated!
>>>>
>>>> Cheers,
>>>> *Nicole Muratore, Shop Manager* (she/her)
>>>> Bike Saviours Bicycle Collective
>>>> (602) 429-9369 | bikesaviours.org | @bikesaviours
>>>> ____________________________________
>>>>
>>>> The ThinkTank mailing List
>>>>
>>>> Unsubscribe from this list here:
>>>> http://lists.bikecollectives.org/options.cgi/thethinktank-bikecollectives.org
>>>>
>>>> ____________________________________
>>>
>>> The ThinkTank mailing List
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe from this list here:
>>> http://lists.bikecollectives.org/options.cgi/thethinktank-bikecollectives.org
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> *Carlyn Arteaga*
>>
>> *pronouns: they/them/theirs*
>>
>> Youth Program Coordinator
>>
>> *BICAS*
>>
>> 2001 N. 7th Ave. | Tucson, AZ 85701 | Shop: 520-628-7950
>>
>> carlyn.arteaga at bicas.org | www.bicas.org | Facebook
>> <http://www.facebook.com/bicascollective/> | Instagram
>> <http://www.instagram.com/bicastucson/>
>>
>>
>>
>> *Through advocacy and bicycle salvage, our mission is to participate in
>> affordable bicycle transportation, education, and creative recycling with
>> our greater Tucson community.*
>>
>>
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com
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>>
>>
>>
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Angel York <aniola at gmail.com>
>> To: The Think Tank <thethinktank at lists.bikecollectives.org>
>> Cc:
>> Bcc:
>> Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:03:14 -0800
>> Subject: [TheThinkTank] Bike!Bike! ¡Dondequiera! / Everywhere! 2021 in
>> review / en revisión
>>
>> *Español abajo*
>>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> Thanks for helping make Bike!Bike! Everywhere! 2021 such a hoppin'
>> weekend!
>>
>> *OVERVIEW*
>>
>>    -
>>
>>    There were a couple dozen events over 3-4 days (depending on how you
>>    count time zones).
>>    -
>>
>>    About 175 people registered. Or maybe 198! Anyway, lots of people
>>    came.
>>    -
>>
>>    About 1400 US dollars were donated and are being distributed as a
>>    stipend to the interpreters (minus fees).
>>    -
>>
>>    Piles of people volunteered in one way or another.
>>    -
>>
>>    New connections have formed.
>>    -
>>
>>    Friends were made.
>>    -
>>
>>    100% of all germs stayed local.
>>
>> *ARCHIVED VIDEOS*
>> Workshops are nearly all posted in English and are still going up in
>> Spanish. Here's the link to the *archived videos:*
>> *https://archive.org/details/@bikebikeeverywhere*
>> <https://archive.org/details/@bikebikeeverywhere> . If you want to help
>> organize the archive data, please send an email to
>> bikebikeeverywhere at gmail.com.
>>
>> *SURVEY RESULTS*
>> Results from the survey were overwhelmingly positive. Suggestions were
>> mostly things we know we need to work on, and we're working on them.
>> They'll happen faster with more committed volunteers, so come join us! We
>> can find a place for you for a wide range of roles/interests and at every
>> skill level.
>>
>> *GET INVOLVED WITH BIKE!BIKE! EVERYWHERE!*
>>
>> *If you've tried to reach out and get involved before* and didn't get to
>> put your awesome skills to their best use, *please try again. We'd love
>> to have you.* We have a better sense of what needs doing. There's more
>> work than volunteers, we're all having a lot of fun, and we'd love your
>> company.
>>
>> *If there is enough core volunteer availability, there will probably be
>> another B!B!E! in early November 2022. We need you to help make it happen!
>> Here's how:*
>>
>>    -
>>
>>    Join the new *planning email list* at
>>    http://lists.bikecollectives.org/listinfo.cgi/bikebike-everywhere-bikecollectives.org
>>    and start *attending meetings* (
>>    https://www.bikecollectives.org/wiki/Meetings_and_minutes).
>>    -
>>
>>    Find something to do the *volunteer roles* list at
>>    https://www.bikecollectives.org/wiki/Bike!Bike!_Everywhere!_Volunteer_Roles
>>    and email bikebikeeverywhere at gmail.com.
>>
>> *BIKE!BIKE! MEXICO CITY 2022*
>> Mujerxs al Pedal (mujerxsalpedal at gmail.com) is hosting an in-person
>> Bike!Bike! in Mexico City (CDMX) June or July 2022. They are planning to do
>> a partial hybrid with online streaming. B!B!E! and B!B!CDMX are in contact
>> and working together to share resources. *Stay tuned at* *bikebike.org*
>> <http://bikebike.org> *for B!B!CDMX sign-ups (coming soon).*
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Hola a todxs,
>>
>> Gracias por ayudarnos a que Bike!Bike! En todas partes! 2021 fuera un fin
>> de semana tan animado.
>>
>> *INFORMACIÓN GENERAL*
>>
>>    -
>>
>>    Hubo dos docenas de eventos a lo largo de 3 o 4 días (dependiendo de
>>    cómo cuentes los husos horarios).
>>    -
>>
>>    Se registraron alrededor de 175 personas ¡o tal vez 198! Como sea,
>>    mucha gente vino.
>>    -
>>
>>    Fueron donados alrededor de 1400 dólares y están siendo distribuidos
>>    (menos algunas cuotas) como remuneración entre lxs intérpretes.
>>    -
>>
>>    Montones de personas voluntariaron de una manera u otra.
>>    -
>>
>>    Nuevas conexiones han sido formadas.
>>    -
>>
>>    Amistades han sido hechas.
>>    -
>>
>>    100% de los gérmenes se quedaron en su lugar.
>>
>> *VIDEOS ARCHIVADOS*
>>
>> Casi todos los talleres fueron subidos en inglés y están siendo subidos
>> en español. Aquí hay un link a los *videos archivados:*
>> *https://archive.org/details/@bikebikeeverywhere*
>> <https://archive.org/details/@bikebikeeverywhere>. Si te interesa ayudar
>> a organizar la información del archivo, por favor manda un correo a
>> bikebikeeverywhere at gmail.com.
>>
>> *RESULTADOS DE LA ENCUESTA*
>> Los resultados de la encuesta fueron abrumadoramente positivos. Las
>> sugerencias fueron mayormente cosas que sabemos que tenemos que trabajar, y
>> estamos trabajando en ellas. Se lograrán más rápidamente con más
>> voluntarixs dedicadxs, ¡así que únete a nosotrxs! Podemos encontrar un
>> lugar para ti dentro de un amplio rango de roles/intereses y en cualquier
>> nivel.
>>
>> *INVOLÚCRATE CON BIKE!BIKE! EN TODAS PARTES!*
>>
>> *Si trataste de acercarte e involucrarte antes* y no pudiste aprovechar
>> tus geniales habilidades, *por favor inténtalo de nuevo. Nos encantaría
>> tenerte.* Ya tenemos una mejor idea de lo que necesita hacerse. Hay más
>> trabajo que voluntarixs, todxs nos estamos divirtiendo mucho y nos
>> encantaría contar con tu compañía.
>>
>> *Si hay suficiente disponibilidad de voluntarixs, probablemente habrá
>> otro B!B!E! a principios de noviembre de 2022. Necesitamos de tu ayuda para
>> hacer que eso suceda! Aquí está cómo apoyar:*
>>
>>    -
>>
>>    Únete a la nueva *lista de correo de planeación* en
>>    http://lists.bikecollectives.org/listinfo.cgi/bikebike-everywhere-bikecollectives.org
>>    y empieza a *asistir a las reuniones* (
>>    https://www.bikecollectives.org/wiki/Meetings_and_minutes).
>>    -
>>
>>    Encuentra algo que hacer en la *lista de roles para voluntarixs,* en
>>    https://www.bikecollectives.org/wiki/Bike!Bike!_Everywhere!_Volunteer_Roles/es
>>    y manda un correo a bikebikeeverywhere at gmail.com.
>>
>> *BIKE!BIKE! CIUDAD DE MÉXICO 2022*
>>
>> Mujerxs al Pedal (mujerxsalpedal at gmail.com) serán anfirionxs de un
>> Bike!Bike! en persona en la Ciudad de México (CDMX) en junio o julio de
>> 2011. Están planeando hacer un evento parcialmente híbrido con
>> transmisiones en línea. B!B!E! y B!B!CDMX están en contacto y trabajando
>> juntxs para compartir recursos. *Mantente al pendiente de* *bikebike.org*
>> <http://bikebike.org/> *para los registros para B!B!CDMX (próximamente).*
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> This was issue #5 of Bike!Bike! Everywhere!.
>> You can subscribe <https://buttondown.email/bikebikeeverywhere> or view
>> this email online
>> <https://buttondown.email/bikebikeeverywhere/subscribers/3651fb41-ae2f-4dbc-ab0a-dba56dbe9880/archive/bikebike-everywhere-2021-in-review>
>> .
>> <http:///api/emails/canary/3651fb41-ae2f-4dbc-ab0a-dba56dbe9880/553bdfb9-9f60-450b-8783-3d9869d48d98/>
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-- 
Jack Murphy
Jack at BikeWalkWichita.org


*Bike Walk Wichita’s Mission is to transform Wichita into a more livable,
accessible, *
*connected city **by making biking and walking safe, equitable, and
appealing.*
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